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a fan of michigan state, but i don't know if you saw the game on saturday with michigan and notre dame, but it was quite something. enough about football. [laughter] huh? >> [inaudible] >> it's, well, i'm just amazed at the turnout here. i thank you for coming out on this night to be here. thank you very much. [cheers and applause] they even gave me a sippy cup. [laughter] i know you're all still recovering from the cnn tea party/republican debate last night. [laughter] how is it that cnn can actually join hands with the tea party, and together -- wolf blitzer said our partners, the tea party express. and i'm like, what kind of alternate universe is this? [laughter] i don't think it is. actually, it's the way it is now, suspect -- isn't it? can you imagine a debate that's called the cnn/teachers' union debate? [laughter] because i will contend there are more members of the teachers' union than there are of the tea party. [cheers and applause] i just don't think we're going to see that debate very soon. but anyways, i have a number of things going through my head that i'd like to say, a
pioneers in the area. they first came here in the 1830s in michigan. that my dad's family, you know they all went -- worked for factories and all that. they have all been great influences on me and feel very fortunate to have been. >> how often do you get back to flint? >> i am there every month. i live north of flint in northern michigan so my dad still lives down there. i am down there once or twice a month, spend a number of days there. he still drives and goes to mass mass every day, ghosted gym. clearly i did not obey him. but, no, i visit flint quite a bit and of course all of my friends are still there. >> a politically active family? >> i wouldn't say politically active? one of the first things i remember is my parents debating kennedy and nixon and my mom was for nixon and my dad was for kennedy. i can remember them out in the garage amid the boxes or whatever having this political debate in my dad being appalled because we are catholic and he would be our first catholic president. my mom's family, her dad was the head of the republican party in the area in the early part o
, actually. >> go ahead, mr. boog. >> yeah. he's a michigan boy. i grew up watching his work on flint, and this actually shows his life before he was a film maker. so i'm really looking forward to seeing these stories from his life. >> bob? >> i was going to say he is, we did a short interview with him in the paper, i think it was actually today which would be by the time you see this, last thursday, and he describes it as -- he says it's not a memoir, that's sort of an anti-memoir, just some stories including, um, i think he was 13 years old wandering around the capitol and got lost, and he ran into bobby kennedy. >> now, gentlemen, a book by michael moore, will that automatically be a large print run? >> i would say, yes. >> i'm sorry, jason, go ahead. >> oh, he has such a big following online already. if you go to his web site already, you can see all the people that are talking about this book. i think it's going to sell a lot of copies. >> well, two other well known authors who might generate automatic large print runs, and they're economic books. sylvia nasser and michael lewis.
. >> go ahead. >> he is a michigan boy. i grew up watching his work on flint. this actually shows his life before he was a filmmaker. i'm looking for a to seeing these stories from his life. >> we did a short interview with him in the paper today which would be by the time you see this last thursday and he describes it as not a memoir. it is sort of an anti mark, just some stories including i think he was 13 years of wandering around the capitol and got lost and ran into bobby kennedy. >> sentiment, a book by michael more. will that automatically be a large print run? >> i would say yes. >> i'm sorry. go ahead. >> he has such a big following online. go to his website and you can see all the people that are talking about this book. i think it will sell a lot of copies. >> well, two other well-known authors who might generate automatic large print runs, and economic books. sylvia nasser and michael lewis. grand pursued, the story of economic genius and boomerang, travels in the third world. what can you tell us about these two books, bob minzesheimer? >> well, probably best known for her las
at the same time, one in detroit, michigan, one in fort worth, texas, commuting back and forth. this in the '30s. 25,000 members between the two churches. after world war ii he gets involved in anti-communism, and he realizes that, hey, roman catholics and he are on the same page, and this man who was against the catholics in the '20s has an audience with pope pius xii in 1947. so's he was an interesting pragmatist. one little footnote, and then i'll take questions if you have them, something i didn't hit. in the 1940s one of norris' young students -- and he was always having young people come along. he was a charismatic kind of individual, and they sort of wanted to be like him and learn from him, and he had a reputation for not taking anything from anybody and so forth. was a young man by the name of john bear. that's -- birch. that's a name that you may know. john birch became a missionary sent out by norris' church to china. while he was in china, late '30s, early '40s, of course, that's when the war was heating up. john birch got involved with military operations and becam
. >> he is from michigan i watched his work on plant and shows his life before he was of filmmaker so i am looking forward to the stories from his life. >> we did a short interview with him in the paper i think today which was last thursday and described it as not a memoir but some stories including 13 years old and ran into bobby kennedy. >> a book by michael moore does that automatically be a large print run the? >> >> he has such a big following online. if you go to the website you see the people who are talking about the book i think it will sell a lot of copies. >> host: well-known authors who may generate automatic large branch runs our economic books. sylvia nasser comes out with grand pursuit and michael lewis, of boomerang troubles in the third-world. what can you tell us about these books bob minzesheimer? >> soviet is best known for her last book which is a beautiful mind which was the oxymoron in was helped by the fact that it became a movie with russell crowe. she has a big following. what she is trying to do is add some humanity and personality. this is a new idea that most p
. president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you, mr. president. i want to speak for a few moments about what is happening, what has been happening all week here in the senate and in the house of representatives. first of all, this year we've seen a terrible string of natural disasters that have shut down businesses, left families homeless across america. as chair of the agriculture committee, i'm certainly very concerned about the flooding along the mississippi and missouri rivers and the record droughts that have devastated the livelihoods of men and women who grow our food across america. in response to that, the senate, on a bipartisan basis, a strong bipartisan basis, responded to provide the funding for fema to help with communities across america -- 48 states -- to be able to responding and be able to do what we always do as americans: to be able to step up and work together and meet these kind of natural disasters and the help that's needed. we sent that to the house. the house decided, on the other hand, that they not only would lower the funding
at the time i became governor in michigan had some taxes that other states didn't. and we had a study done and one of the things it showed pretty clearly is that people were mobile. and we were losing people. and i think there's been some evidence lately in other states where tax increases have resulted in the relocation, the taxes on certain classes of people or income levels or whatever resulted actually in less revenue as they relocated residences to other states. my good oregon constituent is now a las vegas resident. apparently the legislature did a little tax changes in senator wyden's state. i think on the tax expenditure side we're kind of presenting unprecedented testimony today to say, look, let's put them all on the table but let's use them to achieve what, again, senator wyden mentioned, get that rate low. if you start losing these and i think the finance committee has got, you know -- we're counting you to be the champion to fight the poaching of these by other spenders or other interests around the congress who haven't studied the issue the way you have, but you've got to pro
testimony. >> you're welcome, sir. >> the co-chair now recognizes congressman upton of michigan. >> thank you for not only being with here today, but with us for a number of days and days ahead answering questions so i appreciate that flexibility. we know that the u.s. corporate tax rate is the second highest that there is. as we look back at the size of the top 20 companies in the world, 50 years ago, 17 of them were u.s.-based. in 1985, 13 of the top 20 companies were in the u.s., and today, it's about six. the companies that i talked to particularly in michigan and before this committee here in energy and commerce, one of the things that they talk quite about is certainty in the tax code. there's a lot of -- and has been discussion on working with chairman camp and baucus as well to hear their comments from the many hearings that they've had, but the research and development tax credit which stops and starts and stops and starts is a real frustration. accelerated deappreciation has been a bipartisan idea for a long time to encourage investment here in this country and export products o
congressman upton of michigan. >> thank you for not only being with here today, but with us for a number of days and days ahead answering questions so i appreciate that flexibility. we know that the u.s. corporate tax rate is the second highest that there is. as we look back at the size of the top 20 companies in the world, 50 years ago, 17 of them were u.s.-based. in 1985, 13 of the top 20 companies were in the u.s., and today, it's about six. the companies that i talked to particularly in michigan and before this committee here in energy and commerce, one of the things that they talk quite about is certainty in the tax code. there's a lot of -- and has been discussion on working with chairman camp and baucus as well to hear their comments from the many hearings that they've had, but the research and development tax credit which stops and starts and stops and starts is a real frustration. accelerated deappreciation has been a bipartisan idea for a long time to encourage investment here in this country and export products overseas. how would changes in these two, accelerated deappreciati
, chicago athletic association, continental room on michigan avenue. i write here that he traced a chillingly accurate picture of the danger posed by islamic fundamentalism and his potential to release a virulent strain of terrorism on the world. old ideas had to be updated. he explains to the spellbound gathering old risk assessment model was advised. understood in the context of muslim thinking and had to be factored into our thinking of how twisted people could use this theme to create large acts of violence. he wrote at the time of the world trade center bombing, they were putting most of the eggs into the basket of the states that sponsor terrorism. he went on to say if you look at the world trade center bombings people that had been charged and convicted, they were egyptian, pakistani, kuwaity, iraqi and even u.s. persons all coming together. individuals pretty much identified because of their freedom to move across borders, they are bound by a jihad, religious belief as opposed to any nation or state that can quickly assemble or disperse. they beat the russians and beat on
an affirmative action program for the university of michigan that said that it was appropriate to take race into account if you do it in a way that is personal and not a quota and you do a lot of other stuff so that actually no court can figure out what the heck you're doing. which is exactly sort of the standard. if you take it so to diffuse and so vague and so individualized that nobody has a smoking gun that race was the actual factor, then you can do it. and, you know, people in your universities shockingly are able to do these things. and so i don't think as long as that is, you know, the rule, you know, the supreme court is going to be interested in coming back to that issue so soon. is that in the enter regularium an affirmative action had been thrown out in the '90s, the texas legislature i think at the behest of the late republican who is i'm sure very close to everybody here passed a statute that said that in order to increase the number of minority students in texas public education, there was going to be a guaranteed 10% for the top -- the top 10 at each high school would be ent
working to take over elections in michigan. you have an election where the amount of money spent and raised by the candidates is exceeded by a factor of 2-1/2 times by interest groups to the point where judicial election is complicated when you add the formula and have this increasing fear on the part of the public that justice is for sale and all this cash could be affecting decisions that hurt confidence in the courts. so i would love as part of the discussion if -- in particular if we are going to see more outside money coming in what we think about this in terms of trying to protect court. we know courts are supposed to be different. how do we make sure that is the case? in particular the rise in interest group money is making disclosure a profound issue for the courts in ways that ad to the system as we described. just as there are legislative and executive solutions to things around disclosure there could be solutions where a court is asked to step up and change rules. perhaps in a particular case the parties need to disclose particular information as part of the filing. wi
by this story. but he is still a gifted man. he begins to pastor to churches. my michigan, one in fort worth texas. this in the 30s. 25,000 members between the two churches. after world war ii, he gets involved in anti-communism and he realizes that hey, roman catholics here in the same page and this man who was against the catholics in the 20,000 audience with pope pius the 12th in 1947. so he was an interesting pragmatist, a man who could change. but take some questions if you have been the something i didn't care. in the 1940s, but endorses students always having young people, log. a very charismatic kind of individual sort of wanted to be like him and had a reputation for not taking anything from anybody and so forth as a young man by the name of john birch. that is a name that you may know. john birch became a missionary set up a norris this church to china. while he was in china, bait 30s to early 40s, when the war was heating up, john birch got involved with military operations and became an intelligence a. john birch was actually very interesting individual himself. when doolittle's
20 particular counties in different places like michigan, california, and alaska, that kind of thing, and there's a national debate right now as to whether or not that's constitutional, whether that violates the federalism of those states, whether, you know, this is really a states issue and the federal government should get involved. we just had an anniversary of the voting rights act passage. i think that it's still an issue. you know, there's a question of is the south worse than other places; right? i think that's a legitimate questions, but this notion of a check on partisan officials and their changes, i think gets a good thing. i think it's a good thing in part because an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure better than a pound a cure. reviewing an election change before it's made is much less expensive than litigation after the fact, after you've had an election. it could be, you know, discriminatory or problematic. i think also what this review does is help all voters, not just voters of color because politicians are less likely to engage in shenanigans when they kno
to graduate with honors -- on to graduate with honors from the university of michigan law school. he excelled at michigan while waiting tables far local fraternity. he is little known today, but walden really inspired a generation of african-american lawyers, including vernon jordan, lawyer, the counsel to presidents whom i'm sure some of you have heard of. overcan call -- jordan called walden so impressive. he said, quote, i wanted to be a lawyer just like walden. i wanted to walk like him and talk like him and hang out my shingle on auburn street just like walden. above all else pragmatists like walden and the black college presidents prioritized voting rights as the path to black power. and here we see walden challenging the so-called white primary. the laws, the tradition of excluding african-americans from the vote in georgia and elsewhere. and here is the result of his activism. in 1946 after the fall of the white primary, blacks lined up all over the streets in atlanta eager to exercise the franchise. and yet walden and other pragmatists were called accommodationists, uncle toms. and s
and in michigan rick snyder, new republican governor passed sweeping reforms that will affect every kid in the school system in detroit. this is something to me that the millennials get implicitly and i think we need to start really looking at mountaintops when we have the next opportunity which will be in the next presidential election cycle. the other issue that ranks highly is the environment. i argue in my book we need to make a strong case for conservative environmentalism. the republican party has a pretty good history of environmentalism. teddy roosevelt, richard nixon, we can talk about climate change and acknowledge that climate change is happening but is also an inexact science. we know the cover of newsweek in 1975 showed that the globe was going to freeze over. we can acknowledge and talk about it in a reasonable way without embracing the left's solutions which would be -- levee enormous tax burdens for energy consumption. and frankly only reduce carbon emissions in the united states by a minimal amount without touching in the end china. so i think the deal with conservative
this is a special part of the country for me. i actually can recall the big four carriers on lake michigan. nice to see them from time to time. they pulled iron from the north throughout the entire region. one that manufactured oils such as building cars, tractors, trucks and machinery, so did the ship errs, miners and support industries. as a result of the great lakes area, it it flourishes really was a good lesson in how we've come to learn to need each other. that is industry from the states and throughout interdependent. clearly, job retention and job creation are foremost in everyone's minds today. of our president, to the state capital, jobs are the most pressing need. i give you my view on this issue, speaking as the ceo for the company and i do serve on a number of our corporate boards. one of the ways we enhance the value of said 10 to our shareholders is too careful allocation of capital. so we must provide capital businesses that can escrow. the growth is either limited or declining. we have to make discipline investments. and generally, only the very best projects go forward. they're
a response. >> the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you for your courtesy. miss jackson, welcome. thank you for your visit to southeast michigan last month and your tour of the ford river international refuge. i have a number of questions to which i hope you answer yes or no. does epa take public comments into consideration during its rule making? >> yes. >> does epa allow industry representatives to provide comments during the rulemaking process? >> yes. >> does epa take into account during the rulemaking process the cost analysis of the proposed rules on industry and cost of that? >> yes. >> as i remember the writing of the legislation the epa is required in writing these rules to come first to its decisions on the basis of health and come to for decisions on how the rule will be implemented on the basis of other things as well. things like cost and impact on industry and things of that kind. >> that is correct. >> if i am correct the train at will change the sequence of those things the first decision would be cost. the se
, educated at the university of michigan. has written several books, a long list of books. .uest: keeps me busy host: democrat, good morning. caller: i have one question that i keep hearing over and over again from republicans, the tax as corporations pay, if we could just get it down. i would like to know from the man from heritage, the name of a company, just one, that actually pays 35% in taxes after deductions in loop holes. i want an aim of one company. if you cannot give me the name of one company, everything you say is disingenuous. host: put you on the spot here. guest: i think she actually has a good point. if you are -- there are different carve-outs and deductions that get stuck in it the tax code. the actual effective rate is closer to 18%. you are paying the full rate, more or less. it acts as a disincentive to job growth. speaker boehner and president obama said that one of the things they would like to do is motivate the tax rate, the highest in the industrialized world, but eliminate these deductions and credits so that there are fewer barriers for companies. host: we will
time where maybe that paradigm has changed. i just don't know. >> host: shelbitown, michigan is next for lynn on the republican line. >> caller: yes, good morning, gentlemen. i just wanted to throw this out there. i've been thinking about this for quite some time actually. up here in michigan, we've really truly have lost a full decade. we went through eight years of a democratic governor that came in with all kinds of hopes, kind of like this president. with, you know, going to change things and turn things around. and she came in with like a 69% favorable rating. she left with 16%. you just look at detroit, people keep bringing that up and they are absolutely right. it's had 50 years of single party rule and it's just terrible. so if you want to really take a snapshot of what this president is about to do, just take a look at what michigan's at and that's about all i have to say. >> host: any correlation? >> guest: well, it's interesting the second caller who used michigan as kind of -- to suggest the whole country is becoming michigan. >> host: uh-huh. >> guest: there's a correlat
compiled the word list was somebody from michigan or dusseldorf, they didn't get all of them. it's probably some tens of thousands. but the fact of the matter is that even within the tens of thousands, you've got your synonyms, you've got your shades of meaning, and a lot of what are considered words in english aren't. and so, for example, we have the word ruthless. if you look in the oed, there's a word ruth, and not referring to your great aunt, but there's a word ruth that means mercy. it's not a word. it just happens to be in there because somebody put it there. but that's not a word in a real sense. if you subtracted them and you talk about how many words the typical english-speaking college graduate knows, then you get closer to that 30,000, 40,000. so it's that way. but certainly the larger developed languages do have larger vocabularies partly because you can catch them all in amber in these big dictionaries. and also words for us, um, they don't go out of style because you can capture them in dictionary whereas in an indigenous culture, there'll be a word that's used for hundreds a
a somebody from michigan. it is probably tens of thousands but the fact is that even within the tens of thousands of synonyms and shades of meaning and a lot are considered words and english are not. for example, we have the word ruth that means mercy. that is not a word is just in there because somebody put it there but that is not a word if you subtracted them the typical english speaking college graduate knows then you get closer to the 30 or 40,000. but certainly the larger developed languages to have a larger vocabulary is because you can catch them all in amber in the big dictionaries and also words for us down to go out of style because you can capture them in dictionaries but in the indigenous culture a word will be used hundreds of hundreds of years then it drops away and then in nobody remembers that at all. that does not have been with us. i think that is the answer to the question. >> that did it if we can give a round of applause. [applause] >> i think probably everybody in this room wearing a uniform are here because of the board e those one way or another if you think
technology vehicles that has been very useful to democrats in michigan. in the auto industry. so, initially, you have this sort of sense of acquiescence by democrats that, all right, we don't normally offset emergency funding, but to get this through and to avoid another big fight, we're going to do it. but then democrats seemed to sense an opening. there was a newly combative attitude coming out of the white house thaw referred to earlier, and they decided to hold the line on their troops, and they voted against the c.r. in the house, sending the original, in the original vote it we want down to defeat. republicans rallied. they made cosmetic changed to get their people on board. and then the senate, which had been expected to sort of swallow whatever came over from the house, decide that had they would get their back up and that they would block, which they did. so now we're supposed to have a vote on the democrat i go version, which provides extra money in disaster relief without cutting the loan program or the other things that republicans threw in, but that's expected to fail as well.
back. >> chair recognizes congressman camp of michigan. >> well, thank you, mr. chairman. the joint committee on taxation regularly publishes data on average tax rates paid by americans, do they not? >> well, actually we don't make it a routine practice, but we end up for work for your committee and for the finance committee often preparing that information. >> and you have recently published data on that? >> yes, we have. >> and it's made available to the public. >> yes, yes it is. >> you're not alone. the irs also does this. >> the irs reports with a lag because they report on actual compilelations of tax returns filed. >> and congressional budget office does it too, do they not? >> using slightly different modeling assumptions, but, yes, they do. >> according to the recent joint committee on taxation, and i just want to go with this point of millionaires and billionaires pay lower rates than middle class families which is out there in the public domain, and i just want to go at this point. >> certainly. >> on taxation data on income, social insurance, and excise taxes, americans
. >> sarah vowell is our guest and the first call for her comes from michigan. good morning you are on book tv on c-span2. >> caller: hello. thank you very much. i'd like to ask ms. vowell if she thinks that this western as -- westernization ms. moore religious and cultural what they called the white man's beard or was it just commercial people basically to make money, commercialization. >> it's the united states, you don't have to choose. because you have these missionaries and you have these commercial sailors, you have both been going on at once. those missionaries, especially the early ones, they weren't quite idealistic and the accomplished a lot just in terms of literacy, so culturally -- ayman the interesting thing about what the did sites teaching more or less the entire population to read within a generation and 19th century hawaii was maybe the most literate country on earth because of their efforts, and as a consequence those missionaries taught the first generation of hawaii and writers and historians to write and so that the same time they are trying to dismantle the traditiona
of the business roundtable, three term governor of michigan. mr. engler, governor engler was president and ceo of the national association of manufacturers. and edward kleinbard, chief of staff of the joint committee of taxation from 2007 to 2009. he has 20 years of experience practicing tax law in new york, and is currently a professor of law at the university of southern california. this is an extraordinary panel. thank you for honoring us with your presence. senator crapo? >> thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate your holding this hearing as well. i want to focus right at the outset on one of the early comments. that is any part of the important needed changes that we need to be making in america today with regard to economic and fiscal policy, tax reform, is one of the key pieces that we must not allow to be ignored. as you know, i've been working with a group of six, called again. i know that you've been working in other context. senator wyden as well, has to proposal of his own. but the one area of agreement that i think we have among us and among many others is that in addition to contr
at the university of michigan. each of them treats this idea in each of the three in a different way, and still, and some of the books that are still to come in this series also promise to be very interested. vanessa oaks is writing, bruce chilton who many of you may have heard of is writing a biography of the book of revelation. [laughter] so -- >> if he finishes it in a hurry. >> yeah, yeah. right. [laughter] i think october 20th is the deadline. [laughter] the dead sea scrolls. you did, you did try to avoid those anthroto morphic moments, but i thought one thing you said that was quite important was to think about, um, not just the physical object, but its soul, the book's soul. so in thinking about dietrich bonhoeffer and what he left postwar theology, what is the -- when you were thinking about the soul of his letters and papers, how did you come to assess that in terms of its effect on its readersesome? >> aristotle and leon cast and i define soul this way -- [laughter] >> good threesome. >> soul is the integrated, vital power of any organic body so long as it is open to possibility and o
this was was somebody from michigan or dusseldorf it is probably tens of thousands. the fact of the matter is that even within the tens of thousands you have your synonyms, shades of meaning. and a lot of what are considered words in english aren't. and so, for example, we have the word ruthless. well, there is a word to roost, and they're not referring to your great odds. it means mercy. it is not a word. it just happens to be in there because somebody put it there, but that is not a word in a real sense. if you subtracted and and talk about how many words the typical english speaking college graduate knows, you get closer to that 30,000, 40,000. so it is that way, but certainly the larger developed languages to have larger vocabulary's, partly because you can catch them all in amber in these big dictionaries. also, words for us, they don't go out of style because you can be -- you can capture them and dictionary. whereas in indigenous culture there'll be a word that is used for hundreds and hundreds of years and then it drops away and no one remembers it at all. that does not happen with us. i think
vacation in michigan and we were getting 36 miles a gallon. i felt pretty good about it. i was bragging to my friends about it. now i'm bragging on the senate floor. it can be done. we can create more fuel-efficient vehicles. we didn't compromise anything, and we bought america. i think that's what we need to encourage in this country. cars and creating jobs in this country, reducing the need for energy from being imported from overseas and reducing the pollution that unfortunately hinders our environment and our health. i think that's a good thing. so on the senator's first point, sure, more energy at home but put it in perspective. that isn't the answer to america's economic needs. the second point he says is eliminate certain regulations. that that could be true. there are regulations now that don't make any sefnlts get rid of them. i'm not sure this is a big ball and chain being dragged around by our economy, but there's no sense in wasting time or money on regulations that really don't serve a good public purpose mp the final point he said, i couldn't agree more -- tax reform. we l
and to the university of michigan and here's this guy who, in my mind, should've been tried as an enemy or military tribunal and it makes me mad. i know you're a vietnam veteran. i'm pretty sure when you're in vietnam looking at the enemy come you didn't think about giving them the miranda rights or what have you been letting them go through the federal court system. we are facing a different kind of enemy. every time i look at the poster on the back, showing the twin towers, i think about these cockroaches, these murderers commit these terrorist after us now. that particular day, back i saw the battlefield in an asymmetrical term and battlefield in his mind that davis unseat 198 and the northwest flight. i think it's outrageous that this administration does not treat these terrorists as enemy combatants. that is what they are. we need to have a clear view of the animal rear facing for going for going to be successful in securing borders and securing our homeland. i'd like to ask a question. i'm going to pick up on the visa issue that both the secretary and mr. dodaro mentioned as well. i am the ch
. are recognized the gentlelady from michigan, miss miller for five minute. >> i appreciate the witnesses coming today and air service to this nation. a quick observation before i ask my question that the, on something secretary ridge said about the christmas day bomber. the lack of sharing information. this particular incident has fallen off of the national radar screen but hasn't for us in the detroit area. it is crazy watching this guy goes through the federal court system. he is now representing himself. we had to give him his miranda rights. the best place in the nation, here is this guy who in the mind should have been tried as a city combatant in gitmo or a military tribunal. your a vietnam veteran and my husband as well. i'm sure when you were in vietnam looking at the enemy you didn't think about giving him the brand rights and letting them go through the federal court system. we are facing a different kind of enemy and every time i look a poster on the back showing the twin towers i think about these cockroaches, these murderers, these terrorists that are after us. that particular day,
. >> host: first call for sarah vowell is from michigan. good morning. you are on booktv on c-span2. >> caller: thank you very much. i would like to ask sarah vowell if she thinks the western is asian of hawaii was more religious than cultural. what they call the white man's spirit or was it commercial? people basically wanting to make money? commercialization versus the white man's burden? >> guest: it is the united states. you don't have to choose. you have missionaries and commercial sailors. you have both things going on at once. those missionaries, especially the early ones were not quite idealistic and they accomplished a lot in terms of literacy. culturally the interesting thing about what they did besides teaching the entire population to read within a generation, hawaii was the most literate country on earth because of their efforts. as a consequence those missionaries taught the first generation of wine writers and historians to write. at the same time they are trying to dismantle the traditional hawaiian culture especially in terms of religion and dress the missionaries h
for the university of michigan that said it's appropriate to take race into account if you do it in a way that is personal and not a quota and you do a lot of other stuff so that actually no court can figure out what the heck you're doing. which is exactly the set of standard. if you make it so diffuse and so vague individualized that nobody has a smoking gun that race was actually the actual factor, then you can do it and people in the universities shockingly are able to do these things. and so i don't think that's the rule that the supreme court is going to be interested in coming back to that issue so soon. now, what makes this ut case so interesting is that in the interregulinte interregular e- -- inter-regnun, the texas legislature i think at the berest of a late republican whom i'm sure is very close to everybody here passed a statute that said in order to increase the number of minority students in texas public education, there was going to be a guaranteed 10% for the top 10 at each high school would be entitled to go into one of the universities in the ut system. and so the quest
michigan, good afternoon. >> caller: jackson, mississippi,. >> host: sorry about that. >> caller: wanted to know, his roots in the deep south and his response to the movement as being led by doctor cornell. >> guest: i'm not sure i would call anything a movement, but i think that cornell and, we surfaced on this in passing before, i both cornell and others have become sharp critics of the obama administration. and in effect they don't think that obama is doing enough for people who do not have privilege in this country. they think that the obama policies have been tilted too far towards, towards the corporate elite and towards the moneyed elite. and as i said before i think that's fair criticisms. i don't believe, i don't know how they are characterized beyond that but i don't believe that either one of those would say they are leading a movement. i think what they're doing is they are trying to mobilize people who aren't particularly in a point of view and the press the president to embrace a more and encompassing set of policies. >> host: diane williams e-mails in from tampa. thank you
, that the mullahs of dearborn, what they call michigan-istan want to say in the same polity as gambling of fire island. each might decide they're better off going alone. there is something more basic. take a retired federal bureaucrat in her early 50s, retired on fantastic unsustainable pension benefits and health benefits, and enjoying the early years of what is in effect a 30-year holiday weekend, she lives at 26 elm street. the guy at 24 he will misdemeanor street went exactly the same school as her. he doesn't get the 30-day holiday weekend. he has to go to work at hardware store until he drops dead to fund lavish retirement benefits of his neighbor and the retirement that he will never know. those two people can not coexist in the same street anymore than they can in athens or in london. another chasm, young versus old. what is left of american youth will be taxed to the hilt to pay for the retirement and medical care of a baby boom generation who enjoyed a life of american prosperity that their kids will never know. look at the flashmobs. look at the gleeful rampage at the wisconsin state
] and how does a kid from grove city, ohio who worked at mcdonald's earn scholarships to michigan state, oxford university, and the university of chicago law school? >> i worked hard in school, had really terrific teachers, and i think i was fortunate. >> and timely, last question, what has it meant to you that mike dewine who defeated you last year? >> attorney general and i have maintained a friendly relationship in what was a tough election. i think that's to his credit, and i hope mine, and i appreciate what he had to say about me very much. >> let me conclude, mr. chairman. his background and experience shows he's the een tone of the public servant, and it's not only bad for consumers if the nomination is hijacked, but it's bad for the country if he's treated as a pawn in a cynical washington game, so i hope you're here, the colleagues change their minds having met you and seen the quality you show as a nominee. thank you, mr. chairman. >> senator menendez. >> well, thank you, mr. chairman. mr. attorney general, you seem to have a strong record on consumer protection issues, and y
of those people. the person who combated the word list is threatened michigan. they didn't get all of them, but it is probably some tens of thousands. the fact of the matter is that even within the tens of thousands you got your synonyms, shades of meanings kind of a lot of what are considered words in english aren't. and so for example, we had to work worthless. if you look at the oed, there is the word roots, not referring to your great aunt, but ruth means mercy. it's not a word. it just happens to be in there because somebody put it there. that is not a word in a real sense. if we subtract down and talk about how many words the typical english-speaking college graduate knows, then you get closer to that 30,000, 40,000. so it's that way, but certainly the larger developed languages do have vocabularies because you can catch them all in these big dictionaries. and also, words for us don't go out of style because you can capture them in dictionaries. with an indigenous culture, there'll be a word used for hundreds and hundreds of years that drops away and nobody remembers that at all. tha
by the way. at the university of michigan to give people people not problems, one set of groups 10 minutes to solve problems face-to-face and they did very well solving problems. give another set of groups 30 minutes to solve, but they had to communicate by e-mail and those groups could not solve the problems. beware of teleconferencing. face-to-face is just a lot better. some people have the ability to read those things and some don't. the fifth trade i would list is called propriety. the ability to set up scaffolds to control some of your impulses are the most famous experiment in this field, which many of you know is called the marshmallow experiment, done by a kind and walter michelle. michelle took four euros, put them in a room, put marshmallows at a table in front of them. said if you've now, only from a comeback in 10 minutes. if you have any in the marshmallow, i'll give you two. he showed me videos of the kids not getting the marshmallow. there's a little girl baby in her head on the table. one day michelle used an oreo cookie. the guy picks up the oreo, carefully thought the met
american heritage club out of dearborn, michigan. finally, to the far left we have khaled beydoun who is also an attorney and an advocate. what i thought we would do is have each of them speak for a few minutes, share their thoughts about where we have come in this arena of coalition building since 9/11, since the 9/11 tragedy, some of the challenges that we face in the community, some of the successes that we've been able to achieve, both on the grassroots and the national level. and then look at kind of where we are now, 10 years later, and this is where we are again as a community, as a country, some of the challenges that we continue to face, some of the new challenges that might be arising as we look forward. and then what are some of the opportunities and positive opportunities out there that might be ways that we can continue to make success, and really do a better job of telling our story. and what i thought i would do before turn it over to margaret is just set the stage a little bit. looking back from perhaps all of it from a personal express on my part. i came here like a l
-- michigan and west virginia. now, michigan technically could be declared a disaster because it's been under an economic disaster now for several years, but not a natural weather event, but they most certainly are having very tough economic times in michigan. and west virginia always has tough times as one of our poorest states. so really, the whole country is in need. why would the other side sit down when america is lit up with disasters? we have got to ask them to reconsider, move forward with the $7 billion help now, and not only is it the right thing to do and the moral thing to do and what americans do for each other and what we should do, but it's really all about -- besides the moral aspect which is obviously the most important, but there is a real immediate economic benefit to this. if there was ever a jobs bill, mr. president, this is it. i can promise you, having lived through this disaster recovery, it's like a -- a shot in the arm for these communities. literally, every single dollar that leaves our hands and goes to theirs will be spent immediately on food, on clothes, on bui
bachelor's degree from smith college and a master's degree in economics from the university of michigan. ms. lee is co-author of a field guide to the global economy. she is an expert on the north american free trade agreement, international trade, wage inequality and the steel and textile industries. she has appeared on numerous national television and radio shows. she has also on the board of directors of worker rights consortium, united for the fair economy and the national bureau of economic research. ms. lee will you give your opening statement please? >> thank you your honor. good evening ladies and gentlemen of the jury. i submit to you the charges against my client, the public unions of america and the hard-working men and women who belong to them are utterly baseless and should be thrown out of this court. the prosecution's case is founded on shoddy statistics, isolated nonrepresentative anecdotal evidence of a false premise. moreover, i will demonstrate beyond a reasonable doubt that my client has been unfairly scapegoated and is being blamed for crimes that were in fact committed
are on the order for governor focused in which a nap when i had been waiting way back now in michigan. said they had to step a. it's a proportion and may have been captured are 1% or she% over a period of time, a decade. it seems to me in going very pickier an opportunity for a great deal of creativity. this has got to be a legislator's dream to get up-and-down vote. that just never happens in this world and washington. you couldn't really get that to happen in the state legislature very easily. so the idea you can put one thing that our teacher screams for a very large package because the bigger it is, tougher days to vote against if it is the solution. you don't want to go small. you want to go humongous because it's just impossible to vote against at that point. yes, there'll be lots of things people don't like, that much more people that they will like and the benefit of that gain is what carries the day. i actually think we have to be thinking about sensitive or pass budgets on an annual basis, maybe it should be given some annual budget for each of the next 10 years and some baseline
in michigan. so they've had to step up. i mean, as a proportion, and i think dave stockman captured it, is it 1% or 2%, you know, over a period of time, a decade? it seems to me that this isal in going very big here an opportunity for a great deal of creativity. i mean, this has got to be a legislator's dream to get one up or down vote. no amendments? that just never happens in this world in washington. you couldn't get really that to happen in a state legislature very easily. so the idea that you could put one thing, and that argues, just screams for a very large package because the bigger it is, the tougher it is to vote against if it's the solution. you don't want to go small. you want to go humongous because it's just impossible to vote against at that point. and, yes, there'll be lots of things that people won't like, but there'll be much more they will like, and the beneficial effect of acting is what carries the day. and i actually think we ought to probably be thinking about since we haven't passed budgets on an annual basis, maybe part of the work of the supercommittee would b
: fript michigan, good morning. caller: good morning. i'm taking that book from a different perspective, "that used to be us." and we used to be our unto the lord, god, jesus, but now we've gotten away from that. you're talking about china. china is on top for a little bit. but we'll get back to christ and god. we're not going to -- because god made -- and he tears them down. so the point of "that used to be us," we used to be a godly nation. we've gotten away from that. so bank on that. guest: well, we don't really say too much about religious faith. in fact we don't say anything about it in this book, and religious faith is an important thing and important in the united states. but i would mention one old saying in which most americans are familiar, which i think is relevant to the theme of this book and relevant to american renewel and that is god helps those who help themselves. host: the united nations meets again tie discuss the bid by palace for statehood. we're going to have live coverage of that starting at :30 a.m. eastern time in about 20 minutes. tom, i wanted to get your th
prize. i publish a newspaper. we've been publishing the michigan bulletin for 17 years here, and my dad is one of those people who are remembered as a kid used to go down south and he would bring people up in the car. he would drive down and he would pick up some of the guys out of alabama. they're still here in the community and they are like me, their kids are first generation from the south and their kids kids are now here. i really appreciate that you hide light of that type of thing. .. >> caller: do we stay and try to reto our institutions, do we restack the churches, do we come out with our own measures and demand this community make the adjustment for us and fight for our place here in the sun? >> host: all right, lansing, thank you so much. >> guest: it's my belief that this great migration that occur inside the 20th century was a water shed event that helped bring us to a point where legalized caste system as it had existed for so long, for three or four generations, was no longer legally on the books. that was a major change in our history. the next migration or the next
chairman of the energy and commerce, distinguished gentleman from michigan, mr. upton, is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. in 1963, there was a great train robbery in england, at the time, the largest heist ever, and because of the cleverness, the legend continues. the take was 2.6 pounds, that's about $7.5 million in 1963 dollars, and now we have a modern day train robbery. there's a great heist of over half a billion dollars and possibly even willing collaborators, maybe even co-conspirators of the u.s. government who rushed out a $535 million loan to solyndra. .. no, we are not. in 2009 cylinder was the very first company to receive the department of energy loan guarantee funded with stimulus dollars. the company was touted in statements by the president of vice president secretary of energy as a model for the governments investment in green technology. and now less than two years later, solyndra has filed for bankruptcy and was raided by the fbi. ion to stand that are two witnesses today, mr. harrison and mr. subto intend to invoke their right under the f
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